Managing conjunctivitis in AD patients treated with a biologic

The IL-4/IL-13 blocker dupilumab is the first approved biologic for therapy with atopic dermatitis (AD). It is remarkably effective, but a relatively frequent side effect is conjunctivitis, which is best managed preventively [1].W Dupilumab is a highly effective therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe AD. When applied together with topical corticosteroids, 39% of patients gained a complete or almost complete healing…

Insights into pathogenesis of AD define novel therapeutic targets

Novel insights into the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) are leading to many new treatment options–both systemically and locally. Prof. Graham Ogg (Oxford University, United Kingdom) pointed out that AD pathogenesis is complex, encompassing both genetic and environmental risk factors [1]. In addition, different therapeutic targets might be required for different types of AD, e.g. acute vs chronic or Western…

Locally active corticosteroid promising in eosinophilic oesophagitis

Orodispersible budesonide delivered specifically to the oesophagus as a tablet was effective in inducing clinical and histological remission in patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis, according to the data from the EOS-2 trial, reported by Prof. Alfredo Lucendo (Tomelloso General Hospital, Spain) [1]. EOS-2 aimed to test the efficacy of a 6-week open-label induction treatment with oral budesonide (1 mg, twice daily)…

Small molecules: interesting novel treatment options in AD

There is a high need for oral treatments for atopic dermatitis (AD) that cannot be controlled with local therapy. Both phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors are interesting approaches [1]. PDE4 is involved in the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines via the degradation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Targeting PDE4 reduces the production of pro-inflammatory mediators in AD and may…