Tralokinumab improves eczema and reduces staphylococcus aureus colonisation in AD

Expert Name
E. Guttman-Yassky

The fully human, monoclonal, IL-13 blocker tralokinumab showed to be highly effective in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD) [1]. Dysregulation of cell-mediated immune response plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD. As a result, IL-13 and other type 2 cytokines are overexpressed. The presented phase 2b trial included 204 adult patients with moderate-to-severe AD. For 12 weeks,…

Benralizumab does not ameliorate COPD exacerbations

Expert Name
Prof. Gerard Criner

New research shows that the asthma drug benralizumab did not statistically decrease annual COPD exacerbation rates for patients with moderate to very severe COPD, a history of frequent moderate and/or severe exacerbations, and eosinophilic inflammation; although the team did report numeric decreases (GALATHEA/TERRANOVA trials). The data were published in the New England Journal of Medicine in conjunction with Prof. Gerard…

Fumarates and vitamin A derivatives advance and latest insights in non-biologic systemic therapeutic agents in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis

Expert Name
Prof. Peter van de Kerkhof

Prof. Peter van de Kerkhof (Radboud University Medical Center, the Netherlands) presented situations where dimethyl fumarate might be considered as a first-line treatment for psoriasis. Acitretin (synthesised retinoic acid) has a potent activity in pustular psoriasis and erythrodermic psoriasis as monotherapy. In chronic plaque psoriasis, it has a strong therapeutic activity, particularly in combination with phototherapy/UVB. Dimethyl fumarate and acitretin…

Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis: on a spectrum?

Prof. Emma Guttman-Yassky (Mount Sinai Medical School, USA) shakes down the similarities and differences between psoriasis vulgaris and chronic atopic dermatitis (AD) and concludes that they fall under the same pathomechanistic umbrella but with very distinct features [1]. For example, both psoriasis vulgaris and chronic AD are generally characterised by nearly indistinguishable histological psoriasiform dermatitis. At a mechanistic level we…

Understanding genetics to unravel psoriasis and atopic dermatitis pathogenesis

Recent advances in psoriasis and eczema genetics have not only led to innovative interventions and new drug pipelines, in some cases they also allow us to distinguish which patient responds better to which biologic treatment. Prof. Jonathan Barker (Kings College London, United Kingdom) discussed the direct clinical implications that psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) genetics have realised [1]. Furthermore, the…

Statin use elevates risk of eczema and atopic dermatitis

A cohort study showed that patients taking statins are at a significant higher risk to develop eczema/atopic dermatitis compared with individuals not taking these medications [1]. As statins are frequently prescribed in the elderly, dermatologists should be aware of this association. Statins are widely prescribed to patients with lipid disorders or heart disease due to their proven cardioprotective efficacy. They…

Long-awaited oral therapy for moderate-to-severe AD

There is an urgent need for a non-steroid oral therapy for patients, particularly paediatric patients, with severe atopic dermatitis (AD). Small molecules could be the solution. A couple of small molecules are in the pipeline for moderate-to-severe AD, such as several Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, began Prof. Thomas Bieber (University Medical Center Bonn, Germany) in his presentation [1]. In a…

Combinations are hot in AD treatment

In her lecture, Dr Magdalena Trzeciak (Medical University of Gdansk, Poland) advocated combination therapy in AD [1]. Not only can topicals be combined, even novel targeted therapies work better with additional topical treatments. There are many good reasons for using combinations: they provide additive or synergistic efficacy compared to monotherapy, and as the required dose of individual agents can be…

No cancer risk with long-term use of tacrolimus, a topical calcineurin inhibitor, in children with AD

Children that regularly use the topical calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus over more than 10 years face no elevated risk of cancer. This was the result of an observational study including more than 44,000 patient-years of follow-up [1]. “Atopic dermatitis is a chronic disease requiring long-term treatment. Therefore, we need prospective safety studies to evaluate the cancer risk,” said Prof. Regina Fölster-Holst…