Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis: on a spectrum?

Prof. Emma Guttman-Yassky (Mount Sinai Medical School, USA) shakes down the similarities and differences between psoriasis vulgaris and chronic atopic dermatitis (AD) and concludes that they fall under the same pathomechanistic umbrella but with very distinct features [1]. For example, both psoriasis vulgaris and chronic AD are generally characterised by nearly indistinguishable histological psoriasiform dermatitis. At a mechanistic level we…

Understanding genetics to unravel psoriasis and atopic dermatitis pathogenesis

Recent advances in psoriasis and eczema genetics have not only led to innovative interventions and new drug pipelines, in some cases they also allow us to distinguish which patient responds better to which biologic treatment. Prof. Jonathan Barker (Kings College London, United Kingdom) discussed the direct clinical implications that psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) genetics have realised [1]. Furthermore, the…

Statin use elevates risk of eczema and atopic dermatitis

A cohort study showed that patients taking statins are at a significant higher risk to develop eczema/atopic dermatitis compared with individuals not taking these medications [1]. As statins are frequently prescribed in the elderly, dermatologists should be aware of this association. Statins are widely prescribed to patients with lipid disorders or heart disease due to their proven cardioprotective efficacy. They…

Long-awaited oral therapy for moderate-to-severe AD

There is an urgent need for a non-steroid oral therapy for patients, particularly paediatric patients, with severe atopic dermatitis (AD). Small molecules could be the solution. A couple of small molecules are in the pipeline for moderate-to-severe AD, such as several Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, began Prof. Thomas Bieber (University Medical Center Bonn, Germany) in his presentation [1]. In a…

Combinations are hot in AD treatment

In her lecture, Dr Magdalena Trzeciak (Medical University of Gdansk, Poland) advocated combination therapy in AD [1]. Not only can topicals be combined, even novel targeted therapies work better with additional topical treatments. There are many good reasons for using combinations: they provide additive or synergistic efficacy compared to monotherapy, and as the required dose of individual agents can be…

No cancer risk with long-term use of tacrolimus, a topical calcineurin inhibitor, in children with AD

Children that regularly use the topical calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus over more than 10 years face no elevated risk of cancer. This was the result of an observational study including more than 44,000 patient-years of follow-up [1]. “Atopic dermatitis is a chronic disease requiring long-term treatment. Therefore, we need prospective safety studies to evaluate the cancer risk,” said Prof. Regina Fölster-Holst…

Managing conjunctivitis in AD patients treated with a biologic

The IL-4/IL-13 blocker dupilumab is the first approved biologic for therapy with atopic dermatitis (AD). It is remarkably effective, but a relatively frequent side effect is conjunctivitis, which is best managed preventively [1].W Dupilumab is a highly effective therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe AD. When applied together with topical corticosteroids, 39% of patients gained a complete or almost complete healing…

Insights into pathogenesis of AD define novel therapeutic targets

Novel insights into the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) are leading to many new treatment options–both systemically and locally. Prof. Graham Ogg (Oxford University, United Kingdom) pointed out that AD pathogenesis is complex, encompassing both genetic and environmental risk factors [1]. In addition, different therapeutic targets might be required for different types of AD, e.g. acute vs chronic or Western…

Locally active corticosteroid promising in eosinophilic oesophagitis

Orodispersible budesonide delivered specifically to the oesophagus as a tablet was effective in inducing clinical and histological remission in patients with eosinophilic oesophagitis, according to the data from the EOS-2 trial, reported by Prof. Alfredo Lucendo (Tomelloso General Hospital, Spain) [1]. EOS-2 aimed to test the efficacy of a 6-week open-label induction treatment with oral budesonide (1 mg, twice daily)…